The Secret Life of the American President

George Washington, humbly at your service

1799

I believe I may be leaving my Martha soon. I feel so weak from that wretched cough I developed a few weeks ago. However, I am not afraid to die. I have done my duty and served my country. It may not have always been in the best ways, but I tried.

In my will, I have set my slaves free. Over the past years I have started to see things differently and believe they should be given a chance to play with the reins they will have in this new nation.

I do hope I won’t be forgotten.

Mount Vernon- my humble home. I have enjoyed the time I’ve been able to spend here now that my presidential assignment is finished. My main passion is farming. At the moment, I am harvesting wheat, corn, cotton, hemp, flax, and silk. I have experimented with a new patch of soil this season and it has increased the flax harvest exponentially. I’ll be using the land surrounding it in the future.

1797

I have declined to a third term of presidency. A third term could establish a lifetime term, which is not the direction this country needs to move in. Plus, I have grown tired of life in the public eye. I wish to retire to my estate.

September 18, 1793

I had to pleasure of laying down the first stone of what is to become our nation’s Capitol in Washington, D.C. today. It enthralls me to know that this will become such a monumental place in our country in the centuries to come.

April 22, 1793

To keep this country out of the battles grounds which belong solely to Great Britain and France, I have issued a Neutrality Proclamation which I hope will be successful.

1793

I have been re-elected for a second term of presidency. I do hope that serving consecutive terms does not become a usual occurrence in this office; that could cause problems.

1789

Congress has established a Department of Foreign Affairs, which should prove to be an immensely useful piece of our new nation.

June 1, 1789

What a day! I signed the first act of Congress today about the administration of oaths. It pertains to when and how oaths of different offices will be given, due to the Constitution only containing the oath of the presidency.

April 1789: I took my oath of office today on the balcony of the Senate chamber. My entrance just days ago was miraculous, filled with parades and cheering. I was given a barge to ride on to Manhattan, from which I could hear thirteen shots fired, one for each of the states. I wore my best brown suit and carried my sword at my side. My voice trembled many times, but maybe it was for the best. I can’t have the people expecting too much of me.

April 1789: I took my oath of office today on the balcony of the Senate chamber. My entrance just days ago was miraculous, filled with parades and cheering. I was given a barge to ride on to Manhattan, from which I could hear thirteen shots fired, one for each of the states. I wore my best brown suit and carried my sword at my side. My voice trembled many times, but maybe it was for the best. I can’t have the people expecting too much of me.

May 25, 1787

A Constitutional Convention is being held, and (big surprise) I have been elected president of it. I do not understand why they keep assigning these positions to me; they’d be much better off with another more suitable man.